Microsoft is adding more storage for its Office 365.

Microsoft is adding more storage for its Office 365 and SharePoint customers to use with SkyDrive Pro.

SkyDrive Pro, despite its name, is not a variant of SkyDrive. It is designed for business file storage — either in the cloud (SharePoint Online) or on SharePoint 2013 servers — which users can access from a variety of devices.

Microsoft announced updates to its SkyDrive Pro capabilities on August 27 via a new post to the Office 365 technology blog. The changes:

  • Each user now gets 25 GB of SkyDrive Pro storage space (up from 7 GB). This is for both new and existing customers.
  • Customers can increase SkyDrive Pro storage quotas for individual users beyond the default 25 GB, to up to 50 GB and 100 GB.
  • With the new  “Shared with Me” view, users can more easily find documents others have shared with them.

Other features called out in today’s post: An increase in the overall file upload limit in SharePoint Online to 2 GB/file; default recycle-bin retention to 90 days (up from 30); and versioning enabled by default, so the last 10 versions of a document are saved, to prevent inadvertent document deletion or loss.

Microsoft recently decided against fighting Sky Broadcasting Group for the SkyDrive name and officials promised to come up with a new name for SkyDrive. Even though Windows 8.1 was released to manufacturing, there’s still no new name announced for SkyDrive yet.

By  for All About Microsoft |

Microsoft reports IE zero-day attacks

Microsoft is reporting an unpatched vulnerability in all versions of Internet Explorer. All versions of IE, other than those running on Windows Server, are vulnerable. This includes Internet Explorer 11 on Windows 8.1 and RT.

The vulnerability comes from a memory corruption bug which could lead to remote code execution. Microsoft says that they are aware of targeted attacks exploiting this vulnerability on Internet Explorer 8 and 9. Exploits such as these are often version-specific, even if the vulnerability affects multiple versions.

Attacks may be blocked by running a Microsoft “Fix it” solution for an earlier vulnerability:  CVE-2013-1347 MSHTML Shim Workaround.

By  for Zero Day

The Dawn of a New Era for Microsoft Windows

Microsoft Windows XP has become to Old to keep Up with the Modern Demands of everyday Computing, as a Result.

On April 8, 2014, Microsoft will stop supporting XP, but most people are not moving to Windows 8. Indeed, according to a TechRepublic survey, XP users are especially reluctant to move to Windows 8, so what are you going to use for your desktop in 2014? Below are my suggestions that you should strongly consider.

Windows 8 will not be a option as it has proved to not be popular at the moment,
Not to mention its intricate interface, that many have found to be complex to use.
For Microsoft Windows Operating system’s I would use the following:

Microsoft Windows 7

Microsoft Windows Vista

The other Alternatives would be Chrome OS and Linux based Operating System’s

Windows 7 users: Move to SP1 to continue receiving Microsoft support

The end-of-support date for Microsoft’s Windows 7 — without Service Pack 1 installed — is quickly approaching.

Windows 7 RTM (release to manufacturing), with no service pack installed, will no longer be supported as of April 9, 2013, according to a February 14 post on the Microsoft Springboard Series blog. Support for specific Windows releases ends 24 months after the release of a new Service Pack, and Windows 7 SP1 was released in February 2011.

Windows 7 SP1 mainstream (free) support continues until January 13, 2015. Extended (paid) support for Windows 7 SP1 is available until January 14, 2020. (Microsoft continues to provide security updates for free during the Extended support phase of a product.)

The Springboard blog included this chart to explain the differences between Mainstream and Extended support:

typesofmssupport

As far as we know, Microsoft has no plans to release a second service pack for Windows 7. Many of us Microsoft watchers have asked the company about this but received no comment. Microsoft is believed to be moving to a new model, via which it delivers annual refreshes of Windows, rather than big-bang releases once every three years or so, with service packs delivered in the interim.

The new model will likely change policies for some IT shops that have waited until Microsoft ships SP1 of a new version of Windows before even considering to move to the latest release.

The Office division at Microsoft seems to be on a path of sticking with the Service Pack model for the foreseeable future.

Microsoft Issues

The Springboard blog included this chart to explain the differences between Mainstream and Extended support:

As far as we know, Microsoft has no plans to release a second service pack for Windows 7. Many of us Microsoft watchers have asked the company about this but received no comment. Microsoft is believed to be moving to a new model, via which it delivers annual refreshes of Windows, rather than big-bang releases once every three years or so, with service packs delivered in the interim.

The new model will likely change policies for some IT shops that have waited until Microsoft ships SP1 of a new version of Windows before even considering to move to the latest release.

The Office division at Microsoft seems to be on a path of sticking with the Service Pack model for the foreseeable future.